Tag Archives: World Book Day

Checha Primary School reader, Kenya

Favourite books and stories

As we get used to spending more time at home, many of us are taking the opportunity to read more books, enjoying the chance to escape, discover new ideas or even learn a new skill.

Here, readers across the world talk about some of their favourite books and what reading means to them.

 

Shayma, 9, Syrian refugee in Lebanon

 

Reading at a library in Lebanon
Children enjoy a reading activity at a library in Lebanon

I like it when the teacher takes us to the library to read. I forget about the war and that I live in a tent.

Arita, 10, Rwanda

 

Arita and friends reading
Arita (right) reads with two friends at the library

I read a picture book about an airplane and it opened up my eyes to the career that I want to pursue when I grow up.

Tobias, prisoner, Kenya

 

Prisoners in Kenya
Prisoners using books in a class in Kenya

Libraries equip you with relevant knowledge of what is happening around us.

Dala, 11, Aida Refugee Camp, West Bank

 

Dala
Dala and her favourite book Where To?

When I read this story, I imagined myself travelling to all the places the writer describes.

Austin, 6, Kenya

 

Austin
Austin

It is the joyous power of picture books that made me into the young writer and painter that I am today.

Jamia, 16, Uganda

 

Jamia
Jamia in her school library with some of the books she likes reading there

Before we had a library, I had learning from the teacher but now I can learn things for myself.

Christian, 6, Rwanda

 

Christian
Christian

I have always wanted to see a lion but I have never visited a national park. When I come to the library, I can find books where I can see pictures of lions and all the animals that live in a park. Now I say the library is my nearest park that I can visit.

Winnie, 19, Rwanda

 

Winnie
Winnie reading in the library

‘Born A Crime’ by Trevor Noah and ‘I Am Malala’ taught me to never give up even though things seem to be so hard.

Raghad, volunteer librarian, West Bank

 

Raghad
Raghad (far right) with some of the children at her library

Every time I read ‘Each Kindness’ to the children, they tell me they don’t want to miss a chance to be kind to others and this lights something inside me.

Sarah, 12, Kenya

‘Olympic Promise’ is about a boy who love running, which was a talent in him. He became famous after achieving a lot. I kept trying to be like him and know what I was good at until I realised I was good at singing. One day I will excel in music.

 

Many thanks to everyone who contributed to this blog!

These quotes and book recommendations were originally published as part of our World Book Day celebrations in 2018. You can read the original article here.

 

Reading activity in Uganda

Enjoying stories across the world

The books that supporters like you help to send are loved by children across the world!

Here, we’ve gathered together some of their favourite reads which they shared with us to mark World Book Day on the 5th March:

 

Reading can open up a whole new world to the reader, you can become whoever you want to be – a pirate, a spy, a princess, or an animal. By reading you can travel, explore new worlds, and go on adventures. All that is possible just by opening up a book.

– Clarissa, Street Children Empowerment Foundation, Ghana.

 

Thimpu, Bhutan

Bhutan book club

 

Keen young readers in Thimpu, Bhutan, love visiting their local READ Model Centre after school where Ms. Yangcen leads read aloud sessions. Recently, she read I Love Mum with the Very Hungry Caterpillar.

 

Dandora, Nairobi, Kenya

Enjoying books at DADREG's library in Nairobi

 

In Nairobi’s Dandora slum in Kenya, the community library run by our partner DADREG is a place that children love to visit to share stories. It’s a place that keeps them busy away from the local landfill site where many of them often join their families to sift for items to sell to make ends meet:

Reading storybooks puts smiles on our faces and books make learning exciting!

Ghana

Enjoying books in Ghana

 

In Ghana, the kids at the schools and libraries supported by our partner Rainbow Trust love to read all sorts of books; here they show off just a few of them!

We love reading these books because they are colourful and packed full of fun! Some of the books, like Samson: The Mighty Flee and The Wildest Cowboy encourage the children that with perseverance, they can succeed.

Mathare, Nairobi, Kenya

The kids who read at Mathare Youth Sport Association’s (MYSA) libraries in the Mathare slum in Nairobi, Kenya, are lucky enough to have lots of staff and volunteers who read all sorts of stories with them.

Sharing stories at MYSA in Kenya

 

At MYSA’s Mathare North Library the kids recently listened to Librarian Stephen reading We Could Help:

Here in the Mathare slums, people litter everywhere so I chose ‘We Could Help’ so the children realise that they can join hands to clean their communities for a better tomorrow.

– Stephen

And Library Attendant Charles, read them The Little Dancer and Other Stories – because they love to dance!

Sharing stories at MYSA in Kenya

Most of the children I was reading the story to are in the library dancing club. So I thought the story might encourage them to continue dancing and maybe think of starting a ballet dancing club in the library.

– Charles

 

Banjul, The Gambia

Reading at Gambia National Library Service Authority

 

All sorts of children’s fiction and non-fiction books are loved by the kids who read at the Gambia National Library Service Authority’s library! They especially love story books.

 

Kpando, Ghana

Sharing stories in class in Ghana

 

The kids at Delta Preparatory School’s Library Club (which gets books from its local Ghana Library Authority branch) love sharing the The Stone Age to the Iron Age book and learning how tools and farming techniques have changed.

 

Gaza Strip and the West Bank

In the West Bank and Gaza Strip, our partner Tamer Instuitue for Community Education organises all sorts of reading workshops and activities, book launches, discussions and good old read alouds!

 

Musanze, Rwanda

Reading at Agati Library in Rwanda

 

In Rwanda, the kids at Agati Library in Musanze particularly love to be read Momo and Snap, a picture book about the ups and downs of the friendship between a young monkey and a young crocodile.

Reading Momo and Snap creates a feeling of excitement, thrill and even friendship.

Gwanda, Zimbabwe

Young readers at the Edward Ndlovu Memorial Library in Zimbabwe love Funnybones so much that they request it again and again!

 

Tonkolili, Sierra Leone

Reading at Tonkolili District Library

 

In Sierra Leone, children enjoy reading all sorts of books and stories but at Tonkolili District Children’s Library, The Dinosaur Who Pooped A Lot! is a particular favourite!

 

Jamestown, Accra, Ghana

Sharing stories at Street Children Empowerment Foundation in Ghana

 

The children at Street Children Empowerment Foundation’s library in Accra, Ghana are currently reading a book called Mine:

The children love the illustrations and we chose this book because it teaches the children how important sharing is. Sharing spreads happiness – and so do books!

 

We are continuing to work with our partners as much as possible and support them wherever we can as they respond to COVID-19 and find new ways to give as many people as possible access to brand new books.

 

Celebrating 2019!

Supporters like you made 2019 another brilliant year.

 

 

Your support helped to send an astonishing 1,211,423 brand new books to 136 partners in 26 countries, reaching an estimated 25 million readers!

 

What remains of the library
2,500 books were sent to The University of The Bahamas’ library which was destroyed by Hurricane Dorian

 

2019 brought a series of book-destroying disasters and your support helped us respond to global events.

When Cyclone Idai devastated schools in Zimbabwe and Malawi and Hurricane Dorian hit The Grand Bahamas, you helped to send brand new children’s and higher education books, enabling learners to continue their education in the face of disaster.

 

Reading activity in Uganda's Adjumani Refugee Settlement
Displaced children in Uganda’s Adjumani Refugee Settlement are discovering the joy of reading thanks to books you’ve helped to send

 

You also helped us to continue to reach displaced people around the world, sending 25,377 books to refugee camps across Southern Europe and sub-Saharan Africa.

You even helped us bring solar lamps as well as books to secondary school libraries in Kenya’s Kakuma Refugee Camp so that reading and studying no longer has to stop when the sun goes down.

 

Canon School cakes
An astonishing 785 schools fundraised to support our work on World Book Day

 

Children and teachers from 785 schools took part in World Book Day, raising an incredible £98,428 enabling us to send 49,214 books to people who need them most around the world.

 

 

Players of People’s Postcode Lottery helped us do something particularly special – up-cycle a shipping container into a thriving community library in Rwanda!

Together we achieved so much and we would like to thank each and every person who made it possible.

Watch this video to see just some of the ways your support made a difference in 2019!

Big Booky Breakfast

Brand new World Book Day fundraising pack now available!

We are delighted to announce the nationwide launch of ‘The Big Booky Breakfast’. We have developed the Big Booky Breakfast in partnership with World Book Day to give schools a new way to share stories, celebrate books and fundraise on World Book Day, 7th March 2019.

In the past three years alone, schools across the UK have raised over £350,000 by fundraising for Book Aid International on World Book Day – enough to send over 175,000 books around the world to people who would otherwise have few books, or even no books at all.

It costs the charity just £2 to send a book, so no World Book Day fundraising event is too small.

Schools taking part in the The Big Booky Breakfast will receive a free fundraising pack which includes various book themed activities – like a Big Booky Book Swap, a Big Booky Bake Off, Big Booky Short Story or a Big Booky Dress Up. Packs also include stickers, a poster and additional resources to help schools make fundraising fun and easy.

The books schools help to send could reach children who have fled unrest in Cameroon, schools in sub-Saharan Africa where up to a dozen pupils share a single textbook or even stock the shelves of a mobile library drawn by donkey to the most rural schools in Zimbabwe.

Wherever they go, the books schools help to send bring joy. Emmanuel, a young reader in Kenya said:

“I have never seen such beautiful books – they are very funny. I borrowed a book to read at home and could not stop laughing until my mum wondered what was so funny. When I told her the story, she wished she was in primary school to enjoy the books too.”

Schools can request their free Big Booky Breakfast pack as well as DIY costume guides, videos and additional classroom resources here.

Alternatively, schools can contact Book Aid International directly by emailing or calling 020 7733 3577.

 

Canon Slade School cake competition

Reaching more readers on World Book Day

On World Book Day last month, the joy of children’s books and reading was celebrated by children and adults at schools, colleges, universities and workplaces up and down the country.

It was cold and snowing but book lovers didn’t let it stop their World Book Day fun! There was dressing up, cake sales, readathons and much more all in the name of children’s books. Many also fundraised to support our work as part of their celebrations.

We love hearing from our supporters about the creative ways they have celebrated World Book Day and fundraised to help us share the joy of books and reading with more people around the world. We’ve rounded up just a few of them for you to enjoy and be inspired by below.

 

Bay House School & Sixth Form LRC held a Dystopian-themed day and raised £600!

 

Canon Slade School raised £120.25 from their book-themed cake decorating competition.

 

Publisher Cengage celebrated World Book Day with a fancy dress competition and literary-themed cake sale. They raised £158.89 in cake sales and Cengage have generously matched it bringing the total to £317.78!

 

Pupils at Sydenham School marked the day with a Dress Up Day, raising £100!

 

Pupils and staff at Northgate High School raised a total of £356.57 through a whole host of activities to celebrate World Book Day. Their day started with a special assembly all about our work and staff and students alike dressed up, prizes being given for the best costumes. There was also a ‘bake expectations’ book-themed cake decorating competition and sale.

 

We’d like to say a huge thank you to everyone who fundraised for us on World Book Day. It costs just £2 to send a book so every Pound you’ve raised really does make a difference. Together we’ll get more new books to readers around the world who really need them.

 

Guests at dinner

Sending more books through dinners

Supporters like Community Ambassador Jane Penson always amaze us with their passion to help us send more books to readers around the world. For the past three years, Jane has held a fundraising dinner for an increasingly large number of guests to mark World Book Day.

We caught up with her to find out about this year’s dinner – her biggest yet – and what keeps her doing it year on year.

Jane and Alan
Jane and her husband Alan

Can you tell us a bit about this year’s dinner?

The hall was bigger than before but with almost 60 guests it felt pleasantly full and the atmosphere was cheerful and full of chatter. The red table cloths and Book Aid International pictures on a huge screen made the hall very colourful.

There was a second hand book stall stocked with books brought by the attendees on the day. We sold 30 books in total for £5 each.

We had canapés before we sat down and a two-course buffet dinner including a delicious lamb tagine.

The evening always includes a literary quiz which tables complete over the course of the evening. It is very popular and encourages people to move around the room because they have to go looking for the next question sheet.

 

The hall
Jane used red tablecloths and a PowerPoint presentation of images to add colour to the hall

 

How do you go about preparing for such a multifaceted event?

I think about it on and off during the year. In March just after the last dinner, I book the hall for next year, debrief with people who came, send out thank yous and payments, count up the amount raised and so on.

Then the following January/February, I begin putting the quiz together, sending out invitations and collecting ticket payments, briefing the caterer, getting table cloths etc organised, doing table plans, hiring glasses.

You put in a lot of work. What motivates you to keep going?

I believe in the power of education and without books education is almost impossible. In my opinion the only way people, especially women, are going to change their lives and get out of poverty is by education. If I can help, I will.

Book stall
The evening included the chance to purchase second hand books

Tell us about your guests.

We had 57 guests in total and 12 of them were new. My brother in law came for the first time and brought some guests with him. Some returning attendees brought a few new people too. Two new guests also came from the local rotary club which I have recently joined.

So that means 75% were returnees. They come each year because they enjoy the meal, the quiz and the company – a lot of people are local and they know each other. I don’t do a raffle, which could be seen as a missed opportunity but I choose to let people donate extra money only if they wish to. There are certainly some people who appreciate that they have donated in the ticket price and that is all that is expected of them.

Tables of guests
57 guests attended this year’s dinner

How much did you raise in total?

£2,023 including the tax benefit of Gift Aid. That’s enough to send 1,011 brand new books – 17 per guest!

That’s amazing, thank you so much! Do you hope to continue the dinner in future years?

I plan to do it again in 2019 but I don’t intend to carry on growing it at the same rate. In 2016 we had 33 guests, in 2017 44 then then this year 57. I have been aiming for 60 so I am really pleased to have got to 57. I don’t want to go over 60 because it will become a different kind of event and it works really well as it is.

 

Huge thanks to Jane for her hard work and to all the guests who attended the dinner, what an amazing amount you raised!

If you’ve been inspired, take a look at the links below for more fundraising ideas and further information on becoming a Community Ambassador.

New Worlds Through Books

New Worlds Through Books

Every World Book Day, we celebrate the power of books to change lives. This year, we’re celebrating how books can open doors to new worlds; helping people discover new ideas, imagine new futures and learn new skills.

In the run up to World Book Day, we’ve been asking authors and readers to tell us about the books that inspired them when they were young.

Take a look below to see them all – and pick up some book recommendations along the way!

 

Shayma, 9, Syrian refugee in Lebanon

 

Reading at a library in Lebanon
Children enjoy a reading activity at a library in Lebanon

I like it when the teacher takes us to the library to read. I forget about the war and that I live in a tent.

Jacqueline Wilson

I read ‘I Capture the Castle’ by Dodie Smith when I was eleven. I was hooked from the first brilliant paragraph. I’d found the way I wanted to write.

Arita, 10, Rwanda

 

Arita and friends reading
Arita (right) reads with two friends at the library

I read a picture book about an airplane and it opened up my eyes to the career that I want to pursue when I grow up.

Cerrie Burnell

It’s like a doorway back into history learning about these women’s amazing lives and I just think it’s so inspiring.

Learn more about how Cerrie has been inspired by Little Women here.

Tobias, prisoner, Kenya

 

Prisoners in Kenya
Prisoners using books in a class in Kenya

Libraries equip you with relevant knowledge of what is happening around us.

Alice Hemming

I decided that I was a yogini and spent many hours perfecting my lotus position and back bend.

Read Alice’s piece in full here.

Dala, 11, Aida Refugee Camp, West Bank

 

Dala
Dala and her favourite book Where To?

When I read this story, I imagined myself travelling to all the places the writer describes.

Elizabeth Wein

And the story just absolutely transformed my life. It made me go and try to learn medieval Welsh when I was at university, it made me become a student of folklore which I eventually got a PhD in.

Find out more about how The Owl Service inspired Elizabeth here.

Austin, 6, Kenya

 

Austin
Austin

It is the joyous power of picture books that made me into the young writer and painter that I am today.

Hannah Russell (and Little Alf)

The magic inside this book made me want to read, it made me want to write and it just really got me into horses and everything I do now.

Find out more about how My Secret Unicorn inspired Hannah  here.

Jamia, 16, Uganda

 

Jamia
Jamia in her school library with some of the books she likes reading there

Before we had a library, I had learning from the teacher but now I can learn things for myself.

Yaba Badoe

Reading the stories was balm to a lost soul struggling to make sense of peculiar English rituals such as Elevenses . . . Given the exotic weirdness of every-day life around me, it’s not surprising that the Brothers’ Grimm were such a comfort to me or that the themes I return to again and again in the stories I write are to do with rupture and dislocation.

Read more about how Yaba was inspired by Grimms’ Fairy Tales here.

Christian, 6, Rwanda

 

Christian
Christian

I have always wanted to see a lion but I have never visited a national park. When I come to the library, I can find books where I can see pictures of lions and all the animals that live in a park. Now I say the library is my nearest park that I can visit.

Katherine Rundell

It’s so sharp and funny and wise it makes me want to howl with jealousy whenever I read it; I am so grateful it exists.

Find out more about how Katherine was inspired by Charmed Life here.

Winnie, 19, Rwanda

 

Winnie
Winnie reading in the library

‘Born A Crime’ by Trevor Noah and ‘I Am Malala’ taught me to never give up even though things seem to be so hard.

Julian Clary

When I read about what they got up to in that book and the adventures they had on the boat, I thought ‘this is the sort of life I’m going to lead’.

Find out more about how Julian was inspired by Swallows and Amazons here.

Raghad, volunteer librarian, West Bank

 

Raghad
Raghad (far right) with some of the children at her library

Every time I read ‘Each Kindness’ to the children, they tell me they don’t want to miss a chance to be kind to others and this lights something inside me.

Holly Smale

I carried Anne everywhere with me, tucked in my school bag . . . Knowing she was there made me feel stronger, more capable, prouder and more dignified.

Read more about how Holly was inspired by Anne of Green Gables here.

Sarah, 12, Kenya

‘Olympic Promise’ is about a boy who love running, which was a talent in him. He became famous after achieving a lot. I kept trying to be like him and know what I was good at until I realised I was good at singing. One day I will excel in music.

 

A huge thank you to everyone who contributed to our campaign, it’s been wonderful to share in all the ways books inspire and open eyes, minds and hearts. Here’s to World Book Day and the power of books to transform lives!

If you fundraised for us on World Book Day, details of how to get your funds to us are here.

 

New Worlds Through Books

New Worlds Through Books: Holly Smale

It’s World Book Day TODAY, hooray!

In the run up, we’ve been celebrating the power of books to change lives, asking authors and readers to tell us about a book which opened a door to a new world for them when they were young.

To bring our series to a close, we are delighted to have best-selling and award-winning author of Geek Girl Holly Smale tell us about a book which inspired her when she was young.

 

Holly Smale
Holly Smale

 

Sometimes a book turns up at exactly the right moment. At a point in your life when you need it . . .

. . . just one story – or one character – can perform magic: sending you on a different path and altering how you look at yourself or the world around you. It can give you exactly what you were looking for before you even knew you were looking.

A book can give you hope.

For me, that book was Anne of Green Gables by LM Montgomery. Other books have had a huge impact on my life, but none have been as perfectly timed. At the point where I picked up this out-of-fashion, deeply uncool and dusty Victorian novel in the school library, I was eleven years old: exactly the age of Anne at the start of the series. Just like Anne, I was also pale and freckly, awkward and gangly. I was overly verbose – with a tendency to use large words that didn’t always mean what I thought they meant – and an extremely overactive imagination that I encouraged and demonstrated as often as possible. I was passionate and earnest, optimistic and innocent: I, too, had put flowers in my hair and pretended to be The Lady of Shalott more than once.

I was also extremely unhappy. I’d been at my new secondary school nearly a year by that point, and it had been a deeply painful and lonely experience. On the first day I’d been singled out as ‘wrong’ – wrong face, wrong words, wrong general aura – and the bullying had started. By the time my first year was nearly over, I was a completely different girl to the pre-teen who had started school with so much enthusiasm and excitement. Within three terms I’d become shy, self-loathing, anxious: constantly on edge and desperate to disappear. The sunny confidence I naturally carried with me had evaporated. I had no friends. My days were spent alone, wondering what was wrong with me and how I could possibly fix it.

Then along came Anne Shirley, with her red-hair, freckles and uncrushable spirit. She, too, was lonely. She, too, was unwanted and unpopular. She, too, desperately wanted to find somewhere she belonged. But she fought, she remained herself, she rose above it and she ultimately triumphed.

And I loved her. I loved her in a way that I have never loved any fictional character before or since, with all the ferocity and loyalty of a lonely eleven year old. I saw myself in her, understood her pain, felt her hopes. When Anne is rejected by Marilla for not being “pretty” enough, I cried. When she sank to her knees in front of Rachel Lynde to give a melodramatic apology, I laughed because I did that too. When she made friends with Diana I was both jealous and ecstatic, and when she smashed Gilbert Blythe over the head with her slate I cheered and looked around for a boy to treat likewise.

Every step of Anne’s journey – from lonely orphan to unpopular girl at school to beloved friend to paramour to champion – I took with her.

She became more than my friend: she was me, except just a few metres ahead. Showing me I could do it. Proving that I wasn’t weird, there was nothing wrong with me, that that things would be okay. That I was already enough.

So I carried Anne everywhere with me, tucked in my school bag. For those few years, she was my constant companion.

Knowing she was there made me feel stronger, more capable, prouder and more dignified. Her triumphs became my triumphs, and I tried my hardest to be brave and follow her lead. And when the sadness became overwhelming, I buried myself in her story and Anne was always there: giving me comfort, hope and ensuring that I was never alone.

Eventually, I left those painful years behind me. I, too, triumphed. And then – when I tried to write my first adult novel – those teenage years were what I kept coming back to, over and over again. I slowly realised that no book I had read as an adult had touched me in the way Anne had.

And I wanted to give teenagers another friend: someone they could turn to when they had nobody else, who would make them smile, who would let them know they were enough. Who they could carry with them if they needed her too.

So I created Harriet Manners: much like both me and Anne in character. I gave her red hair and freckles, as a little nod of gratitude to the girl who had changed my life. And – with the series Geek Girl – I tried to create a little bit of my own magic to pass on.

Much like people, books come in and out of our lives: sometimes providing entertainment, sometimes escape, sometimes lessons or guidance. But every now and then, the right book finds the right person at the right time.

And when it does? It’s a love that lasts forever.

 

Holly Smale is the author of Geek Girl, Model Misfit, Picture Perfect and All That Glitters. She was unexpectedly spotted by a top London modelling agency at the age of fifteen and spent the following two years falling over on catwalks, going bright red and breaking things she couldn’t afford to replace. By the time Holly had graduated from Bristol University with a BA in English Literature and an MA in Shakespeare she had given up modelling and set herself on the path to becoming a writer.

Geek Girl was the no. 1 bestselling young adult fiction title in the UK in 2013. It was shortlisted for several major awards including the Roald Dahl Funny Prize and the Branford Boase award, nominated for the Queen of Teen award and won the teen and young adult category of the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize and the 11-14 category of the Leeds Book Award.

World Book Day is an annual celebration of authors. illustrators, books and reading. Every year on World Book Day, thousands of school children dress up as their favourite children’s book characters to raise money for Book Aid International, so we can send more brand new books to libraries and schools in Africa and beyond. Last year they raised over £140,000 – enough to send 70,000 books to communities where children would otherwise have extremely limited opportunities to read! Learn more about World Book Day here.

Visit our World Book Day resources page for fundraising tips, 30 brand new classroom activities and 43 costume guides.

Fundraise for Book Aid International this World Book Day and celebrate the power of books to open doors to new worlds!

 

New Worlds Through Books

New Worlds Through Books: Julian Clary

It’s World Book Day tomorrow!

In the run up, we’re celebrating the power of books to change lives and are asking authors and readers to tell us about a book which opened a door to a new world for them when they were young. That might be a book which sparked their imagination or inspired a new hobby or even led them to learn a new skill.

Today we’re delighted to have comedian, entertainer and children’s author Julian Clary join us on the blog to tell us about a book which inspired him:

Don’t have time to watch the full video? Read the transcript below!

“Hello, everyone at Book Aid. Well, a book that opened doors for me was Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome. I read it when I was, I suppose, 11 years old and I’d never been very adventurous until then . . .

. . . but when I read about what they got up to in that book and the adventures they had on the boat, I thought ‘this is the sort of life I’m going to lead’.

So I would say Swallows and Amazons is the book that opened doors for me.”

 

Julian Clary is a comedian, entertainer and novelist. Following the huge success of his children’s series, The Bolds, Julian has written a special story about his much-loved hyena family for this year’s World Book Day £1 books. If you love The Bolds, you can dress up as Bobby Bold on World Book Day using this simple costume guide!

World Book Day is an annual celebration of authors. illustrators, books and reading. Every year on World Book Day, thousands of school children dress up as their favourite children’s book characters to raise money for Book Aid International, so we can send more brand new books to libraries and schools in Africa and beyond. Last year they raised over £140,000 – enough to send 70,000 books to communities where children would otherwise have extremely limited opportunities to read! Learn more about World Book Day here.

Visit our World Book Day resources page for fundraising tips, 30 brand new classroom activities and 43 costume guides.

Fundraise for Book Aid International this World Book Day and celebrate the power of books to open doors to new worlds!

 

New Worlds Through Books

New Worlds Through Books: Katherine Rundell

It’s World Book Day on Thursday 1st March!

In the run up, we’re celebrating the power of books to change lives and are asking authors and readers to tell us about a book which opened a door to a new world for them when they were young. That might be a book which sparked their imagination or inspired a new hobby or even led them to learn a new skill.

Today we’re delighted to have author Katherine Rundell join us on the blog to tell us about a book which inspired her:

 

Katherine Rundell
Katherine Rundell. Photo credit: David Azia

 

“One of my favourite books growing up was Charmed Life by Diana Wynn Jones because it was the kind of book that stretches the edges of your horizon;

. . . it made me see how strange and witty and valiantly, gloriously unhinged a book could be.

It’s a little like Harry Potter, though it was written decades before – it’s about a boy who doesn’t know he is a wizard, who goes to live in a castle full of adult wizards and wreaks a little chaos. There are plots, wild spells, dragons’ blood and actual dragons and a wizard in some really spectacular silk dressing gowns.

It’s so sharp and funny and wise it makes me want to howl with jealousy whenever I read it; I am so grateful it exists.

 

Katherine Rundell is an award-winning children’s writer and a Fellow in English Literature at All Souls College, Oxford. Her books have won, among others awards, the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize, the Blue Peter Book Award, the Boston Globe Horn Book Award in America, the Andersen Prize in Italy and Le Prix Sorcières in France. She lives mostly in London and a little in Oxford, where she works on research into the Renaissance poet John Donne and occasionally goes climbing on rooftops late at night.

World Book Day is an annual celebration of authors. illustrators, books and reading. Every year on World Book Day, thousands of school children dress up as their favourite children’s book characters to raise money for Book Aid International, so we can send more brand new books to libraries and schools in Africa and beyond. Last year they raised over £140,000 – enough to send 70,000 books to communities where children would otherwise have extremely limited opportunities to read! Learn more about World Book Day here.

Visit our World Book Day resources page for fundraising tips, 30 brand new classroom activities and 43 costume guides.

Fundraise for Book Aid International this World Book Day and celebrate the power of books to open doors to new worlds!